Company Employer Non Compete Agreement

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Today, competition bans appear in almost all sectors. This may be because there is more to protect or because the means of communicating this information have become easier. It may also be because people are valuable assets and the loss of talent in the face of competition is a great success. Not only are they an asset, but they can also use what they know about one company in another company. On the other hand, the employer can sue you and sue you for what is called an “injunction” or injunction to prevent you from violating your agreement. Since a breach of a non-competition clause can cause direct harm to an employer, the Tribunal will often apply expedited procedures in these cases. The non-competition clause is laid down in the Companies Act. The Companies Act prohibits employees from performing certain legal functions in another company considered to be a competition without authorization. This prohibition applies to so-called persons who have special obligations to the company. As a lawyer who negotiated the validity of competition bans on behalf of employers and workers in a large number of sectors, I wondered whether, in the real world, non-competition would be applicable. Who is a person who has special obligations to the company? When their landlord was slow to ask them to sign a non-compete clause that would have delegitimized their ancillary sales, they both resigned from the non-competition clause instead of signing it. (Employers should keep in mind that inviting a worker to sign a non-compete clause after having already been employed has possible consequences, as that employer learned by losing two esteemed employees.) Sometimes…